CWCR/RCCR

Canadian Writing Centre Review/ revue Canadienne des centres de rédaction

A publication of CWCA/ACCR

Chronicling narratives of writing mentorship in Canada and facilitating scholarly exchange

  • If you could say anything to faculty about academic integrity…
    Vol. 3, No. 2 (Fall 2021) Stephanie Bell, Associate Professor, York University Writing Centre; co-founder, CWCR/RCCR A clear-cut strategy for undermining the writing centre’s relationship with student writers is to become reporters, adjudicators, or punishers of plagiarism and cheating (Bell, 2018). In its heavy-handed discourse around academic dishonesty, the institution draws a divide between itself and students. Students arrive on campuses to find themselves positioned as likely criminals, and their work is policed by AI that scans it for infractions. Ironically, the institution’s academic dishonesty rhetoric can so undermine the institution-student relationship that it fosters academically dishonest student behaviour (see … Continue reading If you could say anything to faculty about academic integrity…
  • A Short History of CWCA/ACCR: Fifteen years on
    Vol. 3, No. 1 (Fall 2021) Brian Hotson, CWCR/RCCR Editor Introduction Although writing centres in Canada date to the mid-1960s (See Table 1) (Proctor, 2011, p. 418; Bromley, 2017, p. 35), writing tutoring and writing instruction, of course, didn’t begin with the first writing centres. Writing instruction has a progenitor dating to the first European colonizers in what is now called Canada (Halifax Gazette, 1752). Because the Canadian writing centre field is young, many of the key founders and figures in its development continue to add to its literature and practice. These writing centre practitioners in the past thirty years … Continue reading A Short History of CWCA/ACCR: Fifteen years on
  • Trying to capture the full story: Making a post-tutoring session survey
    Volume 2, No. 1 Summer 2021 by Emma Sylvester Emma Sylvester is Coordinator, Writing Centre and Academic Communications, Saint Mary’s University. Introduction As Writing Centre (WC) practitioners, how do we know that students are actually benefitting from our work? Plenty of research has shown that WC use improves students’ grades (e.g., Driscoll, 2015; Thompson, 2006; Trosset et al., 2019, Dansereau, et al., 2020), but how do I know that translates to my own unique institution or to the session I had with a tutee this morning? As a tutor, the immediate feedback of seeing a student’s “lightbulb moment” or hearing … Continue reading Trying to capture the full story: Making a post-tutoring session survey
  • Pandemic Graduate Student Writing and Transition Support: Reflections and Predictions (Part 3)
    Vol. 2, No.8 (Spring 2021)Liv Marken, Contributing Editor, CWCR/RCCR Link to Part II PART III: Looking Ahead In last week’s instalment, Jill McMillan, a Learning Specialist at the University of Saskatchewan, and Nadine Fladd, a Writing and Multimodal Communication Specialist at the University of Waterloo, shared their thoughts about accessibility, transition, and international student support. In part three, our final instalment, Jill and Nadine look ahead to what they envision keeping and what will be changed in the slow transition back to campus.
  • There will be no switch flipping in my future: A look at post-COVID writing centres
    Vol 2., No. 7 (Spring 2021) Julia Lane, Phd, Writing Services Coordinator, Student Learning Commons Early in the pandemic, Kate Elliott, a Graduate Writing Facilitator with the SFU Student Learning Commons, wrote Maintaining Social Cohesion in a Time of Social Distancing, a blog post which she generously allowed me to contribute to. The post was about the opportunities that this moment of seeming isolation presents to get creative about supporting connectivity through virtual means. Here I am over a year later reflecting once again on Kate’s incredible ability to focus on connectivity in the time of social/physical distancing within a … Continue reading There will be no switch flipping in my future: A look at post-COVID writing centres