CWCR/RCCR Blog

Canadian Writing Centre Review / revue Canadienne des centres de rédaction

Chronicling narratives of writing mentorship in Canada and facilitating scholarly exchange

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  • Announcement || CWCA/ACCR 2021 Conference CfP – Transformative Inclusivity: Social Justice and Writing Centres
    8th CWCA/ACCR Conference Transformative Inclusivity: Social Justice and Writing Centres May 17 – 21, 2021 Virtual Conference “[A] culture of access is a culture of participation and redesign” –Elizabeth Brewer, Cynthia L. Selfe, and M. Remi Yergeau Conference Context For our 2021 conference, the Canadian Writing Centres Association / association canadienne des centres de rédaction welcomes proposals on any writing centre-related subject, but particularly proposals that consider and/or critique frameworks of inclusion, access, and accessibility. These themes may be related to anti-racist work and Indigenization at writing centres, to our recent experiences arising from the COVID-19 pandemic, as well as … Continue reading Announcement || CWCA/ACCR 2021 Conference CfP – Transformative Inclusivity: Social Justice and Writing Centres
  • Asynchronous Affordances: WriteAway’s Pandemic Experience
    Megan Robertson Vol. 2, No. 5 (Fall 2020) Megan is a BC ELN (British Columbia Electronic Library Network) Coordinator providing support for tutors and coordinators throughout BC and Alberta. While the rush to emergency remote teaching occurred out of necessity due to the COVID-19 disruption, writing supports already operating only online have an opportunity to reflect on their existing approaches. WriteAway, British Columbia and Alberta’s online asynchronous writing support consortium of post-secondary students, was first piloted in 2012. Through a series of cautious expansions over several years, the service enters this new reality of online tutoring firmly in its operating stage with eighteen … Continue reading Asynchronous Affordances: WriteAway’s Pandemic Experience
  • Honest Discussions in Graduate Writing Cafés
    Keith O’Regan Vol. 2 No. 4 (Fall 2020) Keith O’Regan is the Graduate Writing Specialist at the York University Writing Centre. He has published on disparate fields such as Post-Graduate Writing Education, Film and Aesthetic Theory, and the Poetics of Escapism. His monograph, a comparative analysis of the poetic and theatrical work of Bertolt Brecht and William Blake will be published with Brill in the Spring of 2021. Whether it be in the nature of the workshops offered, the limitations of a typical 60-minute appointment, or in the attention to the concrete tasks associated with short essays, current forms of … Continue reading Honest Discussions in Graduate Writing Cafés
  • Infographic | Writing (and students) throughout history: A timeline of complaints about students and their ills
    Brian Hotson, Co-Editor, CWCR/RCCR Vol. 2, No. 3 (Fall 2020) Click to access the infographic. Robert Zaretsky’s piece in the Chronicle of Higher Education, Our students can’t write. We have ourselves to blame, still rubs me the wrong way, and it was published in 2019. Not only does he belittle his students who are learning to write, but he also quotes from one of their papers, outing the student and their work as “a tad less coherent than others.” It may be safe to assume he’s quoting the student without consent and breaking confidentiality rules (as they are in most … Continue reading Infographic | Writing (and students) throughout history: A timeline of complaints about students and their ills
  • Writing: It’s an outdoor vibe
    Lauren Mckenzie, Language Specialist Saint Mary’s University Writing Centre and Academic Communication Vol. 2, No. 2 (Fall 2020) Lauren Mckenzie lives in Halifax, Nova Scotia and works at the Writing Centre and Academic Communications at Saint Mary’s University. Lauren is currently completing her MA TESOL and research interests include critical and social justice pedagogy, rebellious thinking, fascination and distraction. Writing can be a challenging process that takes time, thought, revision, and mental focus. Students are challenged more than ever to find or recreate writing spaces as traditional venues such as the library or student lounges have limited or no availability. … Continue reading Writing: It’s an outdoor vibe