Register today || 7th CWCA/ACCR conference – Writing Centre Multiverse | Vancouver 2019

Writing Centre Multiverse | Vancouver 2019

Emily Carr University of Art & Design
May 30-31, 2019

> REGISTER TODAY! <

Keynote:
Deanna Reder, Simon Fraser University
Plenary:
Steve Marshall, Simon Fraser University

> Conference Web Page <

Conference Fees

Before April 13, 2019, 11:59PM (Early Bird)
Conference registration fee: $125
Conference registration fee for students: $75

After April 13, 2019
Conference registration fee: $150
Conference registration fee for students: $100

CfP and Save the Date || Academic Writing and English Language Learners Conference, November 1 & 2, 2019, Saint Mary’s University, NS

Save the Date! November 1 & 2, 2019 &  CALL FOR PROPOSALS

The conference for Academic Writing and English Language Learners (AWELL) is a two-day conference designed for faculty, language instructors, composition instructors, and writing centre professionals who teach and tutor ELL students. The goal of the conference is to provide tools and approaches in a workshop format that may be used directly in classrooms and tutoring sessions.

We want to provide an open forum to all those interested in any area of additional language studies and academic writing, including digital writing pedagogies, multiliteracies, plurilingualism, and intercultural writing supports. Questions for consideration may include, but are not limited to:

  • Pedagogy and practice for multilingual classrooms
  • ELL pedagogy relating to globalized students
  • Learning community writing practice
  • Technology in writing practice relating to ELLs
  • Multimodal and digital approaches to ELL writing instruction and practice
  • Considerations of general teaching and learning practice to ELL

Registration is open

Day One registration only ($75.00).
Day Two registration only ($75.00).
Two-day registration ($150.00).
Saint Mary’s University faculty or staff ($100.00).
Student or writing tutor ($75.00).

sponsored by Atlantic Canadian Writing Centres Association (ACWCA), a regional affiliate of the CWCA/ACCR

Annual ACWCA Conference – Saint Mary’s University, Feb 21st

Annual Atlantic Canadian Writing Centres Association Conference, 2019

February 21, 2019

Saint Mary’s University, Halifax

Do you work in writing centres in Atlantic Canada, or are interested in the field? Please join us at Saint Mary’s in February.

Special opening talk on gendered language and writing, provided by the South House Sexual & Gender Resource Centre

To attend, please complete this form; there is no charge for attending.

An optional lunch of $15 is available.

Please stay tuned for the conference program.

SURVEY || Tutoring digital assignments

We are surveying Canadian writing support centre directors, managers, and coordinators regarding policies, practices, and frequency of support for digital assignments. The purpose of this survey is to learn more about how Canadian writing centres are supporting digital projects. Your responses will remain anonymous. The results will be used only for research purposes, and will be shared only with those who participate in the survey.

The eleven survey questions will take approximately 20 min to complete. You can link to the survey here or cut-and-paste this URL into to your browser >> https://goo.gl/forms/kKrbeboaIIc3BKao2

Please contact us if you have any questions.

Thank you for taking the time to supply this information!

 

Stephanie Bell, LA&PS Writing Centre Director, York University
Brian Hotson, Director, Academic Learning Services, Saint Mary’s University

Announcement || Rethinking Our Narratives of “Development” | SouthWestern Ontario Writing Centre Symposium, December 11, York University

Rethinking our Narratives of “Development”

Tuesday, December 11th | York University

Featured talk
Dr. Karen-Elizabeth Moroski, Reconsidering Our Rhetorics: Recentering Writing Centre Work To Support Translingual Writing

Please register by Friday November 16th.
Registration

Symposium website


The notion of the “development” of the student writer runs through writing centre narratives. Here at York University’s Writing Centre, our department’s constitution, mission statement, and practiced introductions with new students all clarify that we’re interested in supporting the development of student writers rather than the perfection of student writing. This frees us from taking on the urgency of our students’ deadlines, and serves as a straightforward rationale for our refusals to proofread work on behalf of student writers. However, it raises significant questions about how we conceptualize “development.”

  • What are the assumptions about “good” or “acceptable” writing that inform our understandings of “development”?
  • How are we communicating these standards to our students?
  • What are we telling them they need to learn or do in order to “become better writers”?
  • What forces pressure us to act as gatekeepers, helping to strip away the aspects of student writers’ languages, cultures, or identities that don’t belong in the academy, and what opportunities do we have to resist these pressures?

Continue reading “Announcement || Rethinking Our Narratives of “Development” | SouthWestern Ontario Writing Centre Symposium, December 11, York University”

How does a country invent a new discipline? || Inkshed and Canadian Writing Centres by Margaret Procter

Margaret Procter is a scholar of writing and rhetoric in Canada, and mentor to many writing centre scholars, tutors, and administrators. Inkshed (CASLL), the brain child of Russ Hunt (St Thomas University), is a key organization in the development of writing and rhetoric in Canada, which Theresa Hyland called, “the grandmother” of both the CASDW and CWCA. The Inkshed archives are an important and vital history and repository.

Inkshed and Canadian Writing Centres (From the WLN Blog, Connection Writing Centers Across Borders)

How does a country invent a new discipline? The answer for Canada would have to involve the organization commonly called Inkshed (otherwise the Canadian Association for the Study of Language and Learning). It brought university teachers together in person and online from 1982 to 2015 to discuss how students learn to use texts, write with their own voices, and interact to develop ideas. In the process, Inkshed gave Canadian writing-centre faculty a way to think about their particular kind of teaching and helped them become growth points in the emerging discipline of writing studies. As a new writing-centre director in the 1990s, I found a community in Inkshed conferences, listserv exchanges, and newsletters. I learned from Inkshed what writing instruction could be, and gained encouragement by seeing others navigate the issues I also faced. Continue reading…