SURVEY || Tutoring digital assignments

We are surveying Canadian writing support centre directors, managers, and coordinators regarding policies, practices, and frequency of support for digital assignments. The purpose of this survey is to learn more about how Canadian writing centres are supporting digital projects. Your responses will remain anonymous. The results will be used only for research purposes, and will be shared only with those who participate in the survey.

The eleven survey questions will take approximately 20 min to complete. You can link to the survey here or cut-and-paste this URL into to your browser >> https://goo.gl/forms/kKrbeboaIIc3BKao2

Please contact us if you have any questions.

Thank you for taking the time to supply this information!

 

Stephanie Bell, LA&PS Writing Centre Director, York University
Brian Hotson, Director, Academic Learning Services, Saint Mary’s University

Announcement || Rethinking Our Narratives of “Development” | SouthWestern Ontario Writing Centre Symposium, December 11, York University

Rethinking our Narratives of “Development”

Tuesday, December 11th | York University

Featured talk
Dr. Karen-Elizabeth Moroski, Reconsidering Our Rhetorics: Recentering Writing Centre Work To Support Translingual Writing

Please register by Friday November 16th.
Registration

Symposium website


The notion of the “development” of the student writer runs through writing centre narratives. Here at York University’s Writing Centre, our department’s constitution, mission statement, and practiced introductions with new students all clarify that we’re interested in supporting the development of student writers rather than the perfection of student writing. This frees us from taking on the urgency of our students’ deadlines, and serves as a straightforward rationale for our refusals to proofread work on behalf of student writers. However, it raises significant questions about how we conceptualize “development.”

  • What are the assumptions about “good” or “acceptable” writing that inform our understandings of “development”?
  • How are we communicating these standards to our students?
  • What are we telling them they need to learn or do in order to “become better writers”?
  • What forces pressure us to act as gatekeepers, helping to strip away the aspects of student writers’ languages, cultures, or identities that don’t belong in the academy, and what opportunities do we have to resist these pressures?

Continue reading “Announcement || Rethinking Our Narratives of “Development” | SouthWestern Ontario Writing Centre Symposium, December 11, York University”

How does a country invent a new discipline? || Inkshed and Canadian Writing Centres by Margaret Procter

Margaret Procter is a scholar of writing and rhetoric in Canada, and mentor to many writing centre scholars, tutors, and administrators. Inkshed (CASLL), the brain child of Russ Hunt (St Thomas University), is a key organization in the development of writing and rhetoric in Canada, which Theresa Hyland called, “the grandmother” of both the CASDW and CWCA. The Inkshed archives are an important and vital history and repository.

Inkshed and Canadian Writing Centres (From the WLN Blog, Connection Writing Centers Across Borders)

How does a country invent a new discipline? The answer for Canada would have to involve the organization commonly called Inkshed (otherwise the Canadian Association for the Study of Language and Learning). It brought university teachers together in person and online from 1982 to 2015 to discuss how students learn to use texts, write with their own voices, and interact to develop ideas. In the process, Inkshed gave Canadian writing-centre faculty a way to think about their particular kind of teaching and helped them become growth points in the emerging discipline of writing studies. As a new writing-centre director in the 1990s, I found a community in Inkshed conferences, listserv exchanges, and newsletters. I learned from Inkshed what writing instruction could be, and gained encouragement by seeing others navigate the issues I also faced. Continue reading…

 

CFP || CWCA/ACCR conference — The Writing Centre Multiverse: Vancouver May 30-31, 2019

The Writing Centre Multiverse: Vancouver May 30-31, 2019

For our 2019 conference, the Canadian Writing Centres Association/L’Association canadienne des centres de rédaction welcomes proposals on any writing-centre-related subject, but particularly invites proposals that explore how Writing Centres navigate, respond to, and negotiate the “multiverse” we all inhabit—in our spaces, our practices, and our research.

How, for example, do any of the following multis inform, enrich, and/or limit our work in the context of our own institutions? How do they intersect or overlap with practical, political, and/or personal concerns around training, pedagogy, administration, decolonization, or wellness,? How do we as writing centre practitioners respond to, negotiate, or resist, any or all of these?

Continue reading “CFP || CWCA/ACCR conference — The Writing Centre Multiverse: Vancouver May 30-31, 2019”

Reading || Readings for Racial Justice: A Project of the IWCA SIG on Antiracism Activism, by Beth Godbee, Bobbi Olson, and the SIG Collective

From International Writing Centers Association:

Continue reading “Reading || Readings for Racial Justice: A Project of the IWCA SIG on Antiracism Activism, by Beth Godbee, Bobbi Olson, and the SIG Collective”

Database || WcORD: The WLN Writing Center Online Resource Database

WcORD: The WLN Writing Center Online Resource Database

 

From: Listserv Misgivings and the WcORD, Connecting Writing Centers Across Borders, Josh Ambrose (March 17, 2016)

 

“If you haven’t checked out the Writing Center Online Research Database, enter a term in the search field at this link. It is like a micro-Google just for writing centers. You can find annotated exchanges from WCenter, links to writing center websites with all of the handouts and videos and resources so many have created, links to journal articles, blogs, podcasts, etc.”  MORE

 

Career opportunity | Manager, Writing Centre (One year contract) | University of Waterloo

Career opportunity  |  Manager, Writing Centre  (One year contract)

Date: February 2014

Reports to: Special Advisor to the Provost on English Language Competency

Jobs Reporting: Writing Centre Teaching Associates

Location: Main Campus

Grade: 10; 35 hours per week

Primary Purpose

The Manager, Writing Centre is accountable to the Special Advisor to the Provost for managing the staff, processes and activities involved in providing outstanding writing support for both undergraduate and graduate students.  A significant role of the Manager is working closely with the Special Advisor to the Provost, Writing Centre staff, Faculties, and key stakeholders on the strategic leadership and transition of the Writing Centre as it evolves to support a more integrated approach to English Language competency development on campus, including implementing recommendations of the 2012 report on Support for English Language Competency.