CfP and Save the Date || Academic Writing and English Language Learners Conference, November 1 & 2, 2019, Saint Mary’s University, NS

Save the Date! November 1 & 2, 2019 &  CALL FOR PROPOSALS

The conference for Academic Writing and English Language Learners (AWELL) is a two-day conference designed for faculty, language instructors, composition instructors, and writing centre professionals who teach and tutor ELL students. The goal of the conference is to provide tools and approaches in a workshop format that may be used directly in classrooms and tutoring sessions.

We want to provide an open forum to all those interested in any area of additional language studies and academic writing, including digital writing pedagogies, multiliteracies, plurilingualism, and intercultural writing supports. Questions for consideration may include, but are not limited to:

  • Pedagogy and practice for multilingual classrooms
  • ELL pedagogy relating to globalized students
  • Learning community writing practice
  • Technology in writing practice relating to ELLs
  • Multimodal and digital approaches to ELL writing instruction and practice
  • Considerations of general teaching and learning practice to ELL

Registration is open

Day One registration only ($75.00).
Day Two registration only ($75.00).
Two-day registration ($150.00).
Saint Mary’s University faculty or staff ($100.00).
Student or writing tutor ($75.00).

sponsored by Atlantic Canadian Writing Centres Association (ACWCA), a regional affiliate of the CWCA/ACCR

Announcement || Rethinking Our Narratives of “Development” | SouthWestern Ontario Writing Centre Symposium, December 11, York University

Rethinking our Narratives of “Development”

Tuesday, December 11th | York University

Featured talk
Dr. Karen-Elizabeth Moroski, Reconsidering Our Rhetorics: Recentering Writing Centre Work To Support Translingual Writing

Please register by Friday November 16th.
Registration

Symposium website


The notion of the “development” of the student writer runs through writing centre narratives. Here at York University’s Writing Centre, our department’s constitution, mission statement, and practiced introductions with new students all clarify that we’re interested in supporting the development of student writers rather than the perfection of student writing. This frees us from taking on the urgency of our students’ deadlines, and serves as a straightforward rationale for our refusals to proofread work on behalf of student writers. However, it raises significant questions about how we conceptualize “development.”

  • What are the assumptions about “good” or “acceptable” writing that inform our understandings of “development”?
  • How are we communicating these standards to our students?
  • What are we telling them they need to learn or do in order to “become better writers”?
  • What forces pressure us to act as gatekeepers, helping to strip away the aspects of student writers’ languages, cultures, or identities that don’t belong in the academy, and what opportunities do we have to resist these pressures?

Continue reading “Announcement || Rethinking Our Narratives of “Development” | SouthWestern Ontario Writing Centre Symposium, December 11, York University”

CFP || CWCA/ACCR conference Writing Centre Multiverse: Vancouver >> May 30-31, 2019

Writing Centre Multiverse: Vancouver May 30-31, 2019

Emily Carr University of Art & Design

May 30-31, 2019

Deadline for submissions is January 10, 2019.

For our 2019 conference, the Canadian Writing Centres Association/L’Association canadienne des centres de rédaction welcomes proposals on any writing-centre-related subject, but particularly invites proposals that explore how Writing Centres navigate, respond to, and negotiate the “multiverse” we all inhabit—in our spaces, our practices, and our research.

How, for example, do any of the following multis inform, enrich, and/or limit our work in the context of our own institutions? How do they intersect or overlap with practical, political, and/or personal concerns around training, pedagogy, administration, decolonization, or wellness,? How do we as writing centre practitioners respond to, negotiate, or resist, any or all of these?

Continue reading “CFP || CWCA/ACCR conference Writing Centre Multiverse: Vancouver >> May 30-31, 2019”

Reading || Readings for Racial Justice: A Project of the IWCA SIG on Antiracism Activism, by Beth Godbee, Bobbi Olson, and the SIG Collective

From International Writing Centers Association:

Continue reading “Reading || Readings for Racial Justice: A Project of the IWCA SIG on Antiracism Activism, by Beth Godbee, Bobbi Olson, and the SIG Collective”

Database || WcORD: The WLN Writing Center Online Resource Database

WcORD: The WLN Writing Center Online Resource Database

 

From: Listserv Misgivings and the WcORD, Connecting Writing Centers Across Borders, Josh Ambrose (March 17, 2016)

 

“If you haven’t checked out the Writing Center Online Research Database, enter a term in the search field at this link. It is like a micro-Google just for writing centers. You can find annotated exchanges from WCenter, links to writing center websites with all of the handouts and videos and resources so many have created, links to journal articles, blogs, podcasts, etc.”  MORE

 

Call for articles: AEQ special section on Writing Center Theory and Practice

The Winter 2014 (Vol. 18, Iss. 4) Issue of Academic Exchange Quarterly, an independent double-blind-peer-reviewed print journal, is now accepting submissions for its special section on Writing Center Theory and Practice.  Articles may explore issues of theory, practice, and experience in writing center work, including qualitative and empirical studies and discussions of pedagogy.

Articles may also consider the following: How writing center professionals cope with change and the eventuality of needing to expand their efforts in response  to new economic and demographic challenges.  Furthermore, as we move towards increasingly virtual and technologically dependent learning communities,
how can these efforts help meet the evolving demands of our students?

In addition to Writing Center Directors and other Administrators, submissions are welcome from professional staff, faculty tutors, and graduate students who work in the writing center.  Manuscript length should be between 2,000 and 3,000 words.  Please identify your submission with the keyword “Center-2.”

Every published article automatically qualifies for inclusion in the upcoming Sound Instruction Book Writing Center Theory and Practice. Submissions will be accepted now until the end of August; however, early submissions are encouraged as they offer the following incentives:
–       longer time for revision
–       opportunity to be considered for Editor’s Choice
–       eligibility to have article’s abstract and/or full text posted on journal’s main webpage
–       opportunity to be considered for inclusion in Sound Instruction Series

For more information, please visit http://www.rapidintellect.com/AEQweb/center2.htm, or email Feature Editor and Sound Instruction Book Editor Kellie Charron at kajr10@comcast.net.