CFP || CWCA/ACCR conference — The Writing Centre Multiverse: Vancouver May 30-31, 2019

The Writing Centre Multiverse: Vancouver May 30-31, 2019

For our 2019 conference, the Canadian Writing Centres Association/L’Association canadienne des centres de rédaction welcomes proposals on any writing-centre-related subject, but particularly invites proposals that explore how Writing Centres navigate, respond to, and negotiate the “multiverse” we all inhabit—in our spaces, our practices, and our research.

How, for example, do any of the following multis inform, enrich, and/or limit our work in the context of our own institutions? How do they intersect or overlap with practical, political, and/or personal concerns around training, pedagogy, administration, decolonization, or wellness,? How do we as writing centre practitioners respond to, negotiate, or resist, any or all of these?

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CFP || CWCA Conference 2017, Toronto

Announcing CWCA’s 2017 Conference

From Far and Wide: Imagining the Futures of Writing Centres

Where: OCAD University, Toronto, Ontario
When: May 25-26, 2017
Keynote: Dr. Frankie Condon, University of Waterloo

In her IWCA award-winning book, Rhetoric of Respect (2016), Tiffany Rousculp makes a call for developing a “rhetoric of respect” within writing centres that “entails recognition of multiple views, approaches, abilities, and . . . limitations” (25). In a community address in 2014, Frankie Condon similarly argues that “we will need to understand and act on the understanding that our most important stakeholders are the students we serve and the communities from which they come. . . We will need to work with our students and their home communities to learn their needs (instead of assuming we know them already or are better qualified to determine what those needs are or should be).” Both writers make the call for writing centres and institutions to have respect for “the individual’s position and experience” (Rousculp 28) in a way that does not assume that the writing centre “knows better” than the writers who enter our doors.

As we look to the future of writing centres in Canada, we must consider how we make space for the multiple stories that writers have to tell—not with the goal of helping them erase differences or assimilate, but with the goal of respecting and valuing the multiple cultures, languages, writing practices, lived experiences, and educational histories that they carry with them.

The Canadian Writing Centres Association invites writing centre practitioners—from far and wide—to consider how we respect individual differences amid pressures to serve ever greater numbers of students on limited budgets and in sometimes challenging administrative contexts. How do we continue to diversify our programs, our tutor training, and our research? And how do we extend our rhetorics of respect outside of our centres, across our institutions, and into our larger communities?

Join us to discuss these and many other questions!

Possible topics might include:

  • How are writing centres negotiating the “growth, changing demographics, [and] urban challenges” (Congress theme 2017) that face our post-secondary institutions?
  • Which strategies and approaches have been shown to foster productive conversations about diversity in our centres?
  • How do we encourage critical reflection on the role of the individual writer within the larger writing centre? How do we hear individual voices among the many?
  • How are communities created within writing centres for and by the students who use them? How do we make space for all writers to be present and heard?
  • How do diversity narratives written in and about the American context translate in our Canadian context? What kinds of cultural translation have to happen to make texts “read” in our contexts?
  • How can a writing centre be transformed by the knowledge and experience of Indigenous students and staff? What models can guide us in this important work?
  • How can writing centres explore issues of language, culture, diversity and respect through partnerships and/or joint programming with other university programs or offices?
  • How do writing centres work with external organizations (through partnerships, service learning, internships, volunteering) to extend our contributions outside of our institutions?
  • How do writing centres take these important conversations online? How do our online interactions with students make possible new and different ways of listening?
  • How can or do writing centres add to or facilitate conversations about diversity among faculty?

Deadline: Please submit your proposals by 11:59pm (EST) January 29, 2017.

Proposals must be submitted through our online submission form. Email submissions will not be accepted this year.

Any individual presenter may be included on up to two (2) proposals, but at least one of the proposals must be for a group presentation (3-5 presenters).

Questions about conference proposals can be directed to CWCA Vice-Chair, Nancy Johnson Squair: squairn@douglascollege.ca

Presenters will be notified by email concerning the status of their proposal(s) by February 24, 2017.

Call for papers || Canadian Writing Centres Association Conference, May 2015, Ottawa, ON

Please join us for our third annual Canadian Writing Centres Association Conference which will be held at the University of Ottawa on Friday, May 29th , 2015 in Ottawa, Ontario. The conference immediately precedes the Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences Annual Conference (CHSS). We welcome writing centre administrators, writing instructors and tutors to join us for a day of discussions about writing centre practice, theory, and research.

Ottawa, as our capital city, has much in common with our profession as writing centres personnel. Ottawa struggles to revision an identity based on two solitudes, just as we often struggle to make connections between faculty and writing services. Writing Centres are at the intersection of languages, teaching , and learning, where we meet the challenges of putting theories and research into practice. We need to constantly problematize inclusive practices, respect diversity, engage with the wider academic community and promote a culture of self-reflection and critical thinking.

Ideas connect us to the world and reconnect us to our lives and our professional practice, and theories and research can reconfirm what we do, or can provide us with fresh perspectives. We invite you to present a paper, conduct a workshop, or suggest a panel or roundtable on one of the following “capital ideas”:

  • The politics of location and funding in the Writing Centre
  • Perceptions of the Writing Centre in the community: Debunking myths.
  • Inclusive practices in the Writing Centre: Focusing on indigenous populations and bilingualism.
  • Opportunities for self-reflection in the Writing Centre.
  • The theory and practice of tutor training for the Writing Centre.
  • Technology and the Writing Centre.
  • Facilitating collaborative practices between Faculty and the Writing Centre.

CALL FOR PAPERS

Proposals are invited from tutors, instructors, administrators and others interested in the teaching of writing. Proposals should in some way address the theme of writing without borders and/or one of the suggested topic areas. We welcome your proposal for one of three formats:

  • 30-minute papers
    • Please plan for a 15-20 minute presentation to allow for discussion
  • 60-minute workshops
    • Workshops should be interactive and appeal to a wide audience
  • 60-minute panel discussions
    • Please submit your discussion topic along with names of presenters. If you are keen to discuss a topic but do not know others interested in leading a discussion on it, please let us know. We may be able to group people with similar topics.

To submit a proposal, please send the name of the proposed session, the session format, the name(s) and affiliation(s) of the presenter(s) and a 250-word proposal. Please specify any AV or room requirements. Please send proposals and inquiries to Vice Chair Lucie Moussu at moussu@ualberta.ca . Proposals are due midnight PST on December 31st, 2014. Proposers will be notified of the status of their proposal by February 2nd, 2015. Update: The deadline for proposals is January 15, 2015. Proposers will be notified of the status of their proposal by February 15, 2015.

Call for papers — Writing without borders: 2014 CWCA/ACCR conference

Conference information

Please join us for our second annual Canadian Writing Centres Conference which will be held at Brock University on May 23rd, 2014 in St. Catherine’s, Ontario. The conference immediately precedes the Congress of the Humanities  and Social Sciences Annual Conference (CHSS) We will provide a welcoming environment for tutors, writing centre administrators, and instructors for discussions of writing centre practice, theory and  research. In keeping with the theme of the CHSS Conference, Borders Without Boundaries, our theme is “Writing Without Borders”.  We hope presenters will explore this theme in a variety of ways. Topics that derive from this theme could include but are not limited to:

  • Writing support without hierarchical borders:  undergraduate, post-graduate, staff, faculty and mature student support
  • Writing support without disciplinary borders:  responding to cross-disciplinary papers / writing in the disciplines & beyond the disciplines
  • Writing support  without cultural borders; writing support for multilingual & multi-dialect writers
  • Communication  without borders:  writing support for multi-media assignments
  • Writing without physical boundaries:  using technology to respond to students’ writing; MOOCs and the Writing Centre.

Support for the supporters:  training and professional development issues in the Writing Centre

Keynote Speaker: Laura Greenfield, co-editor of “Writing Centers & the New Racism

Call for papers

”Proposals are invited from tutors, instructors, administrators and others interested in the teaching of writing.  Proposals should in some way address the theme of writing without borders and/or one of the suggested topic areas. We welcome your proposal for one of three formats:

    30-minute papers

  • Please plan for a 15-20 minute presentation to allow for discussion

    60-minute workshops

  • Workshops should be interactive and appeal to a wide audience

    60-minute panel discussions

  • Please submit your discussion topic along with names of presenters. If you are keen to discuss a topic but do not know others interested in leading a discussion on it, please let us know. We may be able to group people with similar topics.

To submit a proposal, please send the name of the proposed session, the session format,the name(s) and affiliation(s) of the presenter(s) and a 250-word proposal. Please specify any AV or room requirements.  Please send proposals to cwca@uwo.ca   and inquiries to Liv Marken Liv.Marken@usask.ca. Proposals are due midnight PST on December 15th, 2013.  Proposers will be notified of the status of their proposal by January 10th 2014.