Publications || CASLL/Inkshed Newsletter

CASLL no longer exists as an organization, but its contribution to Canadian writing studies lives on. All 110+ issues of Inkshed Newsletter from 1984 to 2012 are now online in space generously provided by CASDW, along with a selection of other Inkshed material.

Go to casdw-acr.ca/resources/casllinkshed-archives/ to see what’s available — and give yourself some time to get caught up by lively discussions and cogent insights, not to mention amusing photos from past conferences.

CFP || IEEE Professional Communication Society Conference, Toronto

If you teach STEM communication at any level, please consider submitting a proposal for and/or attending the IEEE Professional Communication Society Conference July 23-25 in Toronto.

This is a smaller (compared to ASEE or CCCC) conference that is graduate student friendly and provides great opportunities for interactions with your colleagues.

You can view the call for papers here: http://procomm2018.utoronto.ca/how-to-participate/

Blog Post || Executive Function and Writing: What Does It Mean for Writing Centres? – An Open Discussion

From WLN BLog…

Executive Function and Writing: What Does It Mean for Writing Centres? – An Open Discussion

Amanda M Marshall, CTESL, M.Ed., is the Writing Centre Project Coordinator for the Nova Scotia Community College.

I have often joked that I have three fantasy careers: an astronaut, a neuroscientist, and a brew-master. While my career trajectory has not led me in those directions, I do have a keen interest in brain-based learning and in how to help students. When thinking about my role as Writing Centre Project Coordinator one evening, possibly over a pint, my inner neuroscientist and prior learning got me thinking, and I started to do some research into Executive Function (EF) skills. EF skills, which include “cognitive processes such as reasoning, planning, and judgement” (Bradley-Ruder, 2008), reside in the frontal lobe/prefrontal cortex of the brain. Interestingly, “the prefrontal cortex is one of the last regions of the brain to reach maturation…[and] is not complete until near the age of 25” (Arain et al., 2013, p. 435)…

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