CFP || National Conference on Peer Tutoring in Writing | Tacoma, Washington | Nov. 4-6, 2016

National Conference on Peer Tutoring in Writing | Nov. 4-6, 2016 |

University of Puget Sound, Tacoma, Washington

 

From the posting:

Call for Proposals

We especially welcome presentations that consider linkages between the writing center and critical pedagogy, cultural competence, gender and sexuality, multilingualism, universal design, and interdisciplinarity.

Questions for consideration may include but are not limited to:

    • What role can writing centers play in recognizing and nurturing—rather than erasing—difference?
    • In what ways do interpersonal dynamics in individual tutoring sessions relate to larger power relationships within the culture?
    • How do directive and nondirective tutoring approaches interact with student identities? How do
    • we decide when to offer and when to withhold information about prestige dialects and why?
    • How might writing center pedagogy inform tutoring practices in the content areas?
    • Given that most learning disabilities are invisible, how can writing centers use practices that are universally accessible to all learners?

THE PROPOSAL

We are, in short, hoping to inspire presentations that combine research with reflection and introspection with data. Of course, we also welcome writing center scholarship on any topic of general interest to the writing center community.   We will accept up to two (2) proposals from any individual, so long as one of the proposals includes more than one presenter. Presentations will take the following format:

    • Individual Presentations: 15-20 minute papers that will be combined into a panel by the program chairs
    • Panel Presentations:  3 to 4 presentations of 15-20 minutes each on a particular theme or question
    • Round Tables: 15 minutes of introductory comments/question framing by the presenters and then a discussion among attendees
    • Poster Presentations: A research-fair style presentation of research in which the presenter(s) create a visual argument and informally discuss their research with attendees
    • Workshop Session: 75-minute interactive session in which leaders will guide participants through the investigation of a new area of knowledge.

 

Proposals will be accepted until April 15th, 2016.

The complete CFP is available here.

Deadline Extension!

NCPTW 2015: Salt Lake City

As there have been some folks clamoring for more time due to the end of the semester, etc., the conference Co-Chairs (Clint Gardner, Andrea Malouf, and Chris Lecluyse) have decided to extend the deadline for call for proposals for both presentations and SIGs to May 15, 2015. They hope that this extension will alleviate some of the pressure on putting together proposals. They realize, however, that this deadline is after the end of the semester for some of you, so we hope that you will take the time to complete a proposal or encourage others to complete proposals before leaving all things school for the summer.

At this point, the deadline for travel grants—May 31, 2015—remains the same.

View original post

CFP || Inkshed 2015

Inkshed 2015 will be in Ottawa on May 28th, 2015. Read the Inkshed Call for Proposals.

Terry Fallis, Writing Instructor and 2015 Stephen Leacock Memorial Medal for
Humour finalist, will be the featured speaker and will talk about his own writing journey,  “An Unorthodox Journey to the Published Land.”

We will be using “The Game of Writing” web site, developed at the University of Alberta, both before and during Inkshed, to revise and comment on each other’s work.

Below is a brief description of the proposal requirements:

Proposals due: May 4, 2015

This year’s Inkshed gives a new twist to the old practice of inkshedding: it will focus on workshopping participants’ writing. To that end, we are inviting one-paragraph proposals that fit into any of the following three categories:

1. Academic writing projects such as research proposals, dissertation drafts, grant applications, articles, book chapters, etc.
2. Creative writing projects from any genre or form such as poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, drama, etc.
3. Other writing projects—from old to new media, such as blogs, twitter, promotional materials, conference proposals, etc.

Call for papers || 2015 National Conference on Peer Tutoring in Writing and Rocky Mountain Peer Tutoring Conference

(De)Center: Testing Assumptions about Peer Tutoring and Writing Centers

The theme of the 2015 National Conference on Peer Tutoring in Writing (NCPTW) and Rocky Mountain Peer Tutoring Conference is (De)Center: Testing Assumptions about Peer Tutoring and Writing Centers. Throughout its history, peer tutoring has often operated on a set of sometimes untested assumptions, such as that peer-to-peer tutoring is an effective way of learning, that peers can collaborate in non-hierarchical relationships, that a writer’s role in the tutoring session is different than the tutor’s, and that best methodologies are known and easily practiced. As the assumed divide between the classroom, writing center and community shifts, peer tutors are challenged to find a place for themselves within dynamic rhetorical situations. By (de)centering traditional notions of peer tutoring, we can re-imagine the idea of a center as a place and a praxis. Attendees are invited to contribute to the disciplinary discussion. Possible topics include but are not limited to​​

  • Projects or programs that reexamine writing center theory and praxis
  • Empirical studies that analyze or test assumptions about peer tutoring and collaborative learning
  • Histories and ethnographies that examine the myths or lore of writing centers
  • Future directions for peer tutoring and institutional configurations for writing centers
  • The impact of different rhetorical spaces—classroom, center, and community—on writing processes, assumptions, and values

Presentations may take the following formats:

  • ​​Individual Presentation: An individually submitted 15-20 minute paper that will be combined into a panel by the program chairs
  • ​​Panel Presentation:  Three to four 15-20 minute presentations assembled by the presenters on a particular theme or question
  • ​​Round Table: Fifteen minutes of introductory comments by the presenters and then a discussion among attendees
  • ​​Poster Presentation: A research-fair style presentation in which the presenter(s) create a visual argument and informally discuss their research with attendees.
  • ​​​Post-conference Workshop Session: An interactive session of 75 minutes in which leaders will guide participants through the investigation of a new area of knowledge.  These workshops will be held on Sunday morning.

​More information is available at ncptw2015.org. An online submission link will be available soon.

Submission deadline: May 1, 2015

Christopher LeCluyse, PhD
Associate Professor of English
Director, Westminster College Writing Center
Westminster College
1840 S 1300 E
Salt Lake City, UT 84105
(801) 832-2417

Call for Proposals || 2015 IWCA Conference

The 2015 International Writing Centers Association (IWCA) conference proposal deadline is April 1! You can submit proposals online at www.writingcenters.org.

2015 IWCA Conference
Call for Program Proposals

Writing Center (r)Evolutions

We invite you to consider writing center (r)evolutions: the ways in which we create our writing center pedagogies, practices, spaces, and programs through artistic and technological innovations.

We will meet in Pittsburgh, PA, the Steel City, at the Wyndham Hotel to explore writing center (r)evolutions and the ways that these (r)evolutions move writing center conversations forward. Playing on Pittsburgh’s own evolution, we encourage proposals that consider the evolution of your own writing centers and writing center work. Successful proposals might focus on new communities, places, and spaces, and be inspired by (but not limited to) the following threads:

  • Working class and the visual arts–how writing centers channel blue collar versions of Andy Warhol
  • Ways in which visual arts and multimodal composition are at work in writing centers
  • The development of multiliteracy centers and related approaches
  • How writing centers allow students to create and connect
  • Ways in which notions of labor and unions figure in conversations about our work
  • The evolution of working with multilingual writers and multilingual writing
  • More complex and layered ways that writing centers get their work done
  • Ways writing centers respond to the increasingly complex definitions of writing
  • How writing centers foster research, development, and innovation
  • Ways writing centers move institutions forward and build momentum for campus-wide initiatives
  • Ways writing centers reach beyond institutional walls through literacy and partnership activities

General Information

Program Format
The 2015 IWCA Conference consists primarily of 75-minute Concurrent Sessions offered Thursday morning through late Saturday afternoon. Concurrent Sessions may consist of full panel presentations (3 or more presenters); individual presentations (1-2 presenters, 15 minutes) grouped together by topic; roundtable discussions led by two or more facilitators; poster presentations; workshops led by two or more facilitators; Ignite presentations; and Special Interest Groups. Featured presentations will be organized by the Program Chair. Poster sessions will take place on Thursday and Friday afternoons. Special Interest Groups (SIGs) will be offered during 60-minute meeting times on Thursday and Friday evenings.

  • Concurrent Sessions: Individual presentation or conference paper. You will be placed on the program with other presenters with similar interests.
  • Panel Presentations: 3 to 4 presentations of 15-20 minutes each on a particular theme or question.
  • Individual Presentations: 15-20 minute papers that will be combined into a panel by the program chairs.
  • Roundtable Discussions: 15 minutes of introductory comments/question framing by the presenters and then a discussion among attendees.
  • Poster Presentations: A research-fair style presentation of research in which the presenter(s) create a visual argument and informally discuss their research with attendees.
  • Workshop Sessions: 75-minute interactive sessions that encourage participant involvement. Consider including manipulatives, games, etc. to encourage interaction.
  • Ignite Sessions: 5 minute presentations that include 20 presentation slides (PPT or Keynote), each lasting 15 seconds.
  • Special Interest Groups: Special Interest Groups (SIGs) would meet for one hour during the conference. SIGs are typically informal conversations with colleagues and peers. Proposals should include a brief description and overview of how participants will be involved.

Proposal Guidelines

  1. Follow the proposal guidelines.
  2. Be specific and clear about the focus and purpose of your proposal. No supplemental material will be accepted.
  3. Session descriptions should be no more than 300 words. Abstracts should be 70-100 words.
  4. Submit proposals by the deadline: April 1, 2015.
  5. Program invitations will be sent to presenters by May 15, 2015.
  6. All presenters must accept invitations, register, and pay registration fee by August 8, 2015, in order to appear in the conference program.
  7. All presenters and contact information must be accurate and up to date by August 8, 2015.

Please contact Russell Carpenter, Program Chair, at russell.carpenter@eku.edu or 859-622-7403 with any questions regarding the conference proposal submission process.

Call for papers || Digital Diversity, May 2015, Edmonton, AB

From Digital Diversity:

We welcome presentations that will together reflect on the past, present, and future of digital literary and cultural studies; examine synergies across digital humanities projects; and stimulate exchanges across such fields as literary history, history, art history, cultural studies, and media studies.”

Submission deadline: September 26, 2014. Send proposals and CVs by email to digdiv2015@gmail.com